Scholars

© J. Wolfe

© J. Wolfe

This series on ConservationBytes.com takes a page out of our book Tropical Conservation Biology (Sodhi, Brook & Bradshaw) – therein we produced a series of ‘Spotlights’ describing the contributions of great thinkers to conservation science. Each highlight of a Conservation Scholar includes a small biography, a list of major scientific publications and a Q & A on the person’s particular area of expertise. I have published the 10 Conservation Scholars produced in the first edition of the book, and am now slowly adding other notable conservation scientists.

The following (and growing) list of Conservation Scholars is presented alphabetically.

Barry Brook

Barry Brook

Bruce Campbell

Mark Cochrane

Mark Cochrane

Gretchen Daily

Gretchen Daily

Paul Ehrlich

Paul Ehrlich

William Laurance

William Laurance

David Lindenmayer

David Linden- mayer

Georgina Mace

Georgina Mace

Norman Myers

Norman Myers

Daniel Pauly

Daniel Pauly

Stuart Pimm

Stuart Pimm

Hugh Possingham

Hugh Possingham

Peter Raven

Peter Raven

Stephen Schneider

Stephen Schneider

Daniel Simberloff

Daniel Simberloff

Navjot Sodhi

Navjot Sodhi

- - - -

4 responses

24 01 2009
PKapoor-Vijay

I found it useful and wonderful experience to read questions and answers section of eminent Conservation Scholars. Young minds interested in Conservation sciences need this information. My sincere congratulations to Dr Bradshaw and team of Conservationbytes. Promila

24 01 2009
Corey Bradshaw

Many thanks, Promila. I hope to expand this section over the coming years to include a great deal more Conservation Scholars that have done and are doing great work in the field. I’m happy you consider this to be inspiring, so I will continue.

CJA Bradshaw

23 09 2013
BM Maitland

I also am very happy to see you putting this together. I myself am a “young mind” making my way through graduate school (MSc student at U of Alberta) at the moment, and agree wholeheartedly that this information is sorely needed and not given the attention it merits.

I believe that having a firm understanding, and indeed an appreciation, for the great thinkers that have contributed to the fundamental shifts in the way we view the world is essential for science to progress in meaningful ways. My own awareness of the need for this appreciation came from many of my undergraduate professors at the College of Environmental Science and Forestry in NY. For instance, Dr. Charlie Hall, in his course on Ecosystems, provided us with a course reader that included many of the great and foundational works in ecology (e.g. EP Odum, RL Lindeman, RH Whittaker, etc.). Another, Dr. James Gibbs, in his conservation biology course (as outlined in a textbook he edited with Malcolm Hunter) provided us with many “spotlights” on major players in the evolving science. I would also point out the book I just finished reading by David Quamman, “The Song of the Dodo: Island Biogeography in an Age of Extinctions” as an excellent source of this type of historical knowledge. In it he pays homage to the founders of conservation science in a meaningful and thought provoking way. A must read in my opinion for up and coming “young minds.”

At any rate, great idea for a series on your site. I look forward to its expansion.

Cheers

19 12 2013
Benis Egoh

Great read! Maybe add Prof Richard Cowling in future.

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